Modes

Improve your aural skills using our ‘audio unit’ plug-in.

Three Different Ways to Work

Fig. 1 Absolute Mode

In ‘absolute’ mode, its predetermined what you might hear and what variations you might encounter. In the example above, you have to decide what the
– center frequency on the peak EQ is
– what the ‘Q’ ( shape ) of the bell curve is
– and the amount of boost/cut
To get counted as ‘correct’ you have to nail all three, but the choices are limited. In this case, 10 different choices for Fc, 3 different choices for Qs, and 2 choices for gain. So a typical guess would look something like this:
[ 250 Hz ] [ 0.67 ] [ 10 dB ]
Hint: You can always ‘mute’ some choices to make this easier…


Fig. 2 Relative Mode

In ‘relative’ mode, you are presented with two sonic alterations ( an ‘exemplar’ and a ‘problem’ ) and you have to compare them. In the example above, you have to decide whether the
– center frequency on the peak EQ and
– the ‘Q’ ( shape ) of the bell curve is
[ Greater Than ] [ Less Than ] [ Equal ] in the problem EQ setting as compared to the exemplar EQ setting.
To get counted as ‘correct’ you have to nail both, but the choices are limited.


Fig. 3 Manual Mode

In ‘manual’ mode, you are presented with two sonic alterations ( an ‘exemplar’ and a ‘problem’ ) and you have to match them using the manual controls. In the example above, you have control of what the ‘problem’ sounds like and you have to set the
– center frequency on the peak EQ
– the ‘Q’ ( shape ) of the bell curve and
– the gain
so that the problem EQ setting are nearly identical to the exemplar EQ setting.
To get counted as ‘correct’ you have to set all three within a gray area surrounding the actual settings. The choices can be limited ( easier ) or infinitely variable ( hard ).